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An honest movie review on Brad Pitt’s ‘Ad Astra’

October 1, 2019 Franchesca Rivera

If you’re curious to know how the latest space movie fares in our opinion—here’s an honest review on Brad Pitt’s ‘Ad Astra’.

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IMDb

“Ad Astra,” it’s Latin for “to the stars.” And when you have a movie title that’s as deep sounding as that, you would expect great things right? Something along the lines of the mind-bender film, ‘Interstellar’. Or something showing the amazing resilience of humankind like in the ‘Martian’. But unfortunately, Brad Pitt’s newest film ‘Ad Astra’ didn’t deliver with the expectations that we had. Fair warning, this article will contain a lot of spoilers. So if you haven’t watched the film just yet, maybe you can bookmark it for now. But if you have or if you just don’t care. I say, read on:

‘Ad Astra’

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Polygon

‘Ad Astra’ is a sci-fi drama film that tells the story of the astronaut Roy McBride. He is an astronaut with the U.S. Space command that was tasked with a dangerous cosmic mission to save the universe from a phenomenon called “The Surge.” He was chosen because of his connection with the source of “The Surge:” his father. Because the source comes from the failed and last mission of his father called the “Lima Project” in the outskirts of Neptune. Learn more about Brad Pitt’s newest film from the trailer below:

So many plotholes…

I’m aware that ‘Ad Astra’ is a work of fiction. But couldn’t they have answered some of the “why’s” in the movie? We just find it so odd that humans in the film managed to develop technology that enabled them to travel all the way to Neptune. But not sleep-pods or cryo chambers? Or anything that might help mitigate the mental stress of long-term space travel? Especially since in the movie, Brad Pitt’s character was always subjected to a regular psychological exam. And even bigger, since it was revealed that his father’s mission went haywire because of the mental stress? But yes without that “trigger” the whole story wouldn’t have come to pass. It’s just so illogical to have that much technological capability and showing interest in the astronauts’ mental health. But not have developed technology to address the mental stress of astronauts? It’s a major plothole in our opinion.

It’s not all bad…

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Smithsonian Magazine

One of the redeemable qualities of the film is how they showcased the beauty of our solar system! And that’s because the film used real NASA imagery and footage of the moon and Mars. At the very beginning of the movie, Roy McBride (Brad Pitt) is shown working on the “International Space Antenna,” a tower so high that it reaches the upper atmosphere of the Earth. And when the camera panned down to show the Earth’s surface, it actually made us develop a fear of heights a little bit. But it was a mix of both fear and awe, it looked so stunningly realistic. Much like the majority of the film that touches on realistic elements. So does the emotional struggles of Roy McBride with his identity and relationship with his father.

 

Overall ‘Ad Astra’ takes you on a trip through our solar system that’s just filled to the brim with top-notch realistic imagery. Although it’s a very slow-moving film, and in all honesty just feels like Brad Pitt working on his “daddy issues.” We honestly wouldn’t travel all the way to Neptune and risk the lives of my fellow men just to resolve that. But hey, that’s our opinion.

 

What did you think of Brad Pitt’s ‘Ad Astra’? Have you watched the film? And if you’ve read this review without watching it, would you still want to? We’d love to hear what you think! So share with us your thoughts in the comments down below! Or hit us up on our Facebook or Twitter @UDoUPh.